Monsters vs. TrollHunter

2 comments

2 comments

TrollHunter was a bit dull, even though I liked the idea behind it. Monsters wasn't very original, but it wasn't quite dull. Trolls are more interesting than giant octopi, which kind of makes this a close matchup. Neither of these am I likely to rewatch, but if I had to it'd probably be TrollHunter. Monsters just doesn't have anything worth seeing again. TrollHunter has trolls, even if the events around them are blah.

Really good matchup. I thought TrollHunter was immensely entertaining despite having some problems here and there. I should really see Monsters again, but I remember liking it a good deal. These two feel very similar. For now, I'll pick TrollHunter.

I found Trollhunter to be more entertaining than Monsters. Neither are great, neither are bad. I just preferred the story of hunting trolls to crossing a border.

I totally agree w/ King Of Pain on this one.

I liked Monsters much more on first viewing as I appreciated what Gareth Edwards was going for i.e. using a minimal budget to try and create a more cinema verite-driven character piece with monsters in it. In hindsight, it was an indicator of what was to come with Godzilla and Rogue One; an earnest attempt at creating character-driven blockbuster fantasies with beautifully rendered visual effects (as that was Gareth Edwards background), but where the characters ultimately fall flat because just having scenes of a motley crew of characters talking with one another without anything interesting to say doesn't make good characters. I gave it some leeway in Monsters because casting two relative unknown actors and having them talk with each other like normal people on an road trip through an apocalyptic Mexican exclusion zone felt fresh in a monster film at the time, whereas hiring big-name character actors like Bryan Cranston and Forrest Whittaker in subsequent films didn't do Edwards any favours. Troll Hunter had an engaging central performance by Otto Jespersen, without which the premise would have potentially fallen flat. Aside from that, and some admittedly beautiful (if overused) cinematography of the Norwegian wilderness, it's essential euro-Cloverfield, where the rest of the characters are obnoxious, irritating 20-somethings pointing and screaming at things. The thing which both films have in common as a positive are visually spectacular finales with a bit more subtext than the film might have previously let on, albeit both ending in the abrupt manner often found in this genre. If it were based on the endings alone, Monsters would probably win, but for now, I'm giving the edge to Troll Hunter as it is a slightly better package overall. Neither great, neither terrible, both well-intentioned and with distinct ambitions, but ultimately falling short of their potential.