Sandlot - Baseball signed by Babe Ruth
Unlike other websites, our Top Ten lists are created from the empirical data of our global rankings decided upon collectively by all the users of Flickchart.

As the American pastime, it’s only fitting that baseball should have been the subject of so many beloved movies. Baseball lends itself easily to the film medium, in part because the game is structured much like a narrative. It is a game that appeals to fans of all ages, from children who play Little League and pick-up games in their backyards all the way up to the old timers who love to tell stories of their time on, or around, the diamond. Baseball movies have captured it all, from up-and-comers to has-beens and never-weres.

Though Major League Baseball players real and fictitious are the most prolific figures, movies have often found diamonds in the rough elsewhere. The movies on this list focus on boys and girls playing youth baseball, a team of women, and even an owner whose contribution to baseball is rooted in nerdy sabermetrics rather than exciting athleticism. These are the Top 10 Baseball Movies of All-Time, as determined by the Flickchart global community.  Read the rest of this entry »

louisville-comic-con-march-28-29-30-2014-fri-sat-sun-kentucky-international-convention-center-13[1]

For the first time anywhere, you can be part of a live Flickcharting session! Flickchart contributor Travis McClain (that’s me!) will moderate a panel at Wizard World Louisville on Saturday, March 29.

In this unique panel, we will pit your favorite comic-based movies against one another using randomly generated head-to-head matches from the website Flickchart. What do we really love in a comic-based movie? When has Hollywood surpassed our hopes? Are they good comic-book movies, or are they good movies? Audience vote will decide the winner of each match, from which a ranked list will be created.

DAY: Saturday, March 29

PANEL TITLE: “Movie Match Up”

TIME: 5:30-6:15pm

ROOM: 210

In this unique panel, we will pit your favorite comic-based movies against one another using randomly generated head-to-head matches from the website Flickchart. What do we really love in a comic-based movie? When has Hollywood surpassed our hopes? Are they good comic-book movies, or are they good movies? Audience vote will decide the winner of each match, from which a ranked list will be created.

For ticketing and other show information, visit Wizard World Louisville.

3rd-flickchart-awards

2013 was a huge year for great films – everything from instant classic historical biopics, to pushing the boundaries of what film and storytelling in general can do. For the third year in a row, Flickcharters voted for their favorites in a myriad of categories, celebrating the past year in film. The nominees were diverse – showcasing the best, the brightest, and in some cases, the worst that 2013 had to offer. Now, after the Globes and the Oscars are a recent memory, and after all of our votes have been tallied, here are your winners for the 3rd Annual Flickcharters’ Choice Awards!

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robocopVS

Part man. Part machine. All cop.

Detroit police officer Alex Murphy has his body broken and is left for dead. When a powerful company interested in supplying mechanical super-soldiers for law enforcement picks up the pieces and outfits Murphy with cybernetic components, he becomes the nigh-invincible Robocop, and winds up solving his own murder.

This forms the basic plot of the 1987 Paul Verhoeven-directed classic, Robocop, as well as the entirely unasked-for remake that is currently in theaters. It’s the latest in a long string of 1980s-themed remakes and sequels that an idea-starved Hollywood has been cranking out for the past decade and a half. Yet die-hard fans of the original may be surprised to learn that this updated Robocop actually brings something new to the table.

How does director José Padilha‘s new vision stack up against the original? Step into the Reel Rumbles ring and find out. It’s time for Robocop vs. RobocopRead the rest of this entry »

Don't Pass Me By - Rachel Noll as Hannah & Sean Stone as Josh

Lawrence of Arabia opens with Lawrence’s death because director David Lean felt it was necessary to anchor audiences at the outset of such a lengthy film to where the story was going. (Besides, everyone already knew Lawrence was dead, so it wasn’t much of a spoiler.) We open here with a similar scene, though the exact details of what is happening, and to whom, is obfuscated. We can’t even make out the faces on the screen. We just know they’re people watching someone possibly dying. Rather than establish an ending point for Don’t Pass Me By, the opening here throws us into the deep end. From there, we’re thrust immediately into what can best be characterized as a frenetic soap opera.

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