Movies To See Before You Die: Se7en

Nigel Druitt

A self-described fanboy, Nigel has always looked at movies as entertainment first and art second. (Not that a film can't be both.) His personal Flickchart Top 20 is dominated by the likes of Frodo Baggins, Indiana Jones, Marty McFly and Christopher Nolan. Nigel is the Canadian arm of the Flickchart Blog, but try not to hold that against him. You can find him on Flickchart as johnmason, where his chart is currently undergoing a major overhaul.

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9 Responses

  1. Anonymous says:

    I think the reason that JON DOE is so scary is because he is a serial killer in the true sense of the word. A lot of the people you listed – Krueger, Vorhees, Ghostface, etc – are more slasher villains and thus just not as “real world” terrifying.

    Your point about Fincher’s more recent films is an interesting one, although you might have been able to make it more thoroughly had you seen BENJAMIN BUTTON and THE SOCIAL NETWORK. Both are them are very good (in fact I think the latter is a near masterpiece), but they do sort of lack the gritty rebelliousness of his earlier works…they feel more fine tuned, which can be both a good and a bad thing.

    Great piece overall, really made me want to revisit this film. On a side note, have you seen the [the films of] video series? They’re montages that highlight the career of particular directors – so far the creator has done Sofia Coppola, Danny Boyle, David Fincher and Wes Anderson. The Fincher one is particularly impressive, and really makes you realize what a masterful and meticulous filmmaker his is. Check it out: http://www.vimeo.com/21482856?ab

    • Nigel Druitt says:

       Tom: You’re absolutely right about those slasher villains. In fact, the scariest character that I can think of who approaches Doe is, in fact, Hannibal Lecter, with whom Doe shares a lot of similarities (at least in looks and mannerisms).

      And you’re absolutely right about me not seeing Ben Button and The Social Network, so I tried to acknowledge that. In fact, that’s why I turned this into a Movie To See Before You Die post about Se7en; I was originally trying to piece together a Directors Who Dominate post about Fincher, and realized I was not qualified.

      Thanks for sharing that video; really cool!

  2. Tom Clift says:

    I think the reason that JON DOE is so scary is because he is a serial killer in the true sense of the word. A lot of the people you listed – Krueger, Vorhees, Ghostface, etc – are more slasher villains and thus just not as “real world” terrifying.

    Your point about Fincher’s more recent films is an interesting one, although you might have been able to make it more thoroughly had you seen BENJAMIN BUTTON and THE SOCIAL NETWORK. Both are them are very good (in fact I think the latter is a near masterpiece), but they do sort of lack the gritty rebelliousness of his earlier works…they feel more fine tuned, which can be both a good and a bad thing.

    Great piece overall, really made me want to revisit this film. On a side note, have you seen the [the films of] video series? They’re montages that highlight the career of particular directors – so far the creator has done Sofia Coppola, Danny Boyle, David Fincher and Wes Anderson. The Fincher one is particularly impressive, and really makes you realize what a masterful and meticulous filmmaker his is. Check it out: http://www.vimeo.com/21482856?ab

  3. Hannibal says:

    I am going to start with one of your only faults.  There is no way that JOHN DOE is more “savage or terrifying”(Silence of the Lambs) than the master himself, Hannibal Lecter.  Otherwise this was a good webpage.  I myself loved the entire movie until the end.  I thought the plot and the way the murders were devised were very original.  My problem was the ending.  Pride, Greed, Gluttony, Sloth, Lust, and Envy all died but Wrath survived.  The rest got there punishment in death for there “crimes” and Wrath survives.  It ruined the whole movie.  Somehow Wrath should have died at that same moment.

    • Nigel Druitt says:

      Your point is taken about Lecter. Indeed, The Silence of the Lambs scared the bejeezus out of me; it’s just a matter of opinion.

      Meanwhile…the ending. “Wrath” doesn’t survive. Mills’ wife is the Wrath murder. Doe himself is Envy, killed by Mills after Tracy is murdered. There is, indeed, a body count of seven in the movie. (As I recall; they find the Sloth victim alive, but he finally succumbs, right…?)

      And, ultimately, what happens does far more damage to Mills than him being killed would, doesn’t it?

    • Nigel Druitt says:

      On reflection, I’ve gotten this a little confused. Tracy is the “Envy” death; Doe is the “Wrath” death. But these two are different from the others. The first five murders were John Doe punishing the sinner; the last two are victims of the sinner. Doe himself commits the “Envy” sin, and kills Tracy. By killing Doe, Mills “becomes” Wrath.

  4. Stillcrows says:

    The scene that irked me was the one where Freeman’s character is in the Library.  First, the whole entry scene was cliche and forced, taking me right out of the mood the rest of the film created.  Second, it all came too easy (his aha moment) and simplistic, especially when translating “grossly speculative” said factoids to Pit’s character.  The other scene is with Freeman and Paltrow in the diner – lame, just outright lame – poor dialouge, poor delivery, could have and should have been cut.  Those were the two places the film left me dry and back in the here and now, which is the exact opposite reason why I watch movies.