10 Movies We Can’t Wait To See In 2016

David Conrad

David has a PhD in History from the University of Texas at Austin. He loves classic film, classic TV, Tolkien, and Star Trek. He lived in Japan for three years and is always eager to talk about it. Follow him on Twitter at @davidaconrad or e-mail him at david@flickchart.com.

You may also like...

3 Responses

  1. Lis says:

    Hannah – When the Wicked rumors first came out, I wanted Lea Michele and Kristen Bell. Unfortunately, I think KBell is too old now (for the movie), but I could still see Lea Michele as Elphaba. She absolutely has the voice. I don’t think Anna Kendrick has the range (she herself has said that she has very little voice training) and, while I saw Megan Hilty play a glorious version of Glinda on stage in LA (Popular had me crying I was laughing so hard), I also think she’s too old. I don’t have any other ideas for a Glinda, though.

    • Thanks for the comment! I think this one is especially tough to cast because those are not easy roles for young non-singers to pull off. They require a lot more range than a lot of people have, and as much as I love Anna Kendrick and would watch her in anything, I don’t think she’s right for it. I’m iffy on Lea Michele vocally (the forced pop-ness of it rubs me the wrong way), but out of most of the big names being tossed around for the role, she’s the one I’d be happiest to have as Elphaba. She’s certainly the most capable.

      Personally, though, I’d love to see them cast some recent stage Elphabas or Glindas. There are some wonderfully talented women who have tackled the role in the last 5 years or so who would still be (mostly) age appropriate, and I’d love to see them get tossed into the mix. While I doubt we’ll get a Hollywood unknown, let alone two, you never know — Jeremy Jordan made it into TL5Y after not making much of a splash on the screen, and Nikki Blonsky rocked Hairspray. Sometimes it works out!

  2. Brian Swaldi Brian Swaldi says:

    Everything the Cohen brothers do is pointless and pretentious. Psuedointellectuals like that junk so they can pat themselves on the back for it. Llewyn Davis featured some good music, but the soundtrack was the only bright spot. C’mon, it was the story of a jerk musician having a bad week. At the end, he was still having a bad week and he was still a jerk. He hadn’t changed and neither had his luck. The only feeling I had at the end was “why did I waste my time to watch this guy circle the drain to a handful if decent folk tunes”?